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The Upcoming 16-inch and 14-inch MacBook Pros

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One of the upcoming Mac Pro updates will continue to use the same design as the 2019 model, jokingly immortalized as "cheese grater" in the world of consumer technology.

Apple Silicon debuted a year ago with the M1 processor in the latest MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, and Mac Mini.

The upcoming iMacs will also reportedly be powered by Apple's own chips. The report does note that the computers will still have multiple USB-C ports as well, though.

According to MacRumors, the LG 4K display had been listed as "Sold Out" for a long time, so the removal of it from the store may not be a huge surprise, and it may also just be a question of lower customer demand. Other reports have also claimed Apple is developing MacBook Pros with a new design and no Touch Bar. The Intel-power choices will be absent in these models and Apple will be utilizing their M1 processors for the 16 and 14-inch models.

As for the Mac Pro, Apple is said to be releasing a new version of the machine with Apple's ARM-based chipsets that'll resemble a Power Mac G4 Cube, according to Bloomberg.

When Apple launched the M1 chip, it opened up the possibility for iPhone and iPad apps to run natively on the new machines.

Besides the additional ports, the new devices are expected to work Return MagSafe to your Mac lineup. Apple could also bring back the MagSafe magnetic charging connector and a wider range of ports, reducing the need for costly dongles.

In terms of the release date, there are speculations that the new MacBook Pro will launch in the middle of the year. Current models have four USB-C Thunderbolt 3 ports, two on each side.

Apple introduced the Touch Bar in the 2016 Mac computers, providing a small OLED screen where the physical function keys were located. A report out of Bloomberg suggests we will finally get the long-awaited redesign of the iMac in addition to a smaller version of the Mac Pro, both featuring variants of Apple's M series processors.

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