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Nintendo targets fan games in DMCA takedown

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Nintendo targets fan games in DMCA takedown

According to Ben Porter, a member of the group that built No Mario's Sky, the development team was aware they would likely receive a takedown notice from Nintendo and had already started working on new sprites for the game. Games affected include Mario, Zelda, and Pokémon based creations among others, and Game Jolt have responded, as they are required to, by locking the pages of the games in question.

"NO MARIO'S SKY IS NO MORE-IO!" the team announced. Rather than closing down the game, the developers of ASMB Games has figured out another enchanting way to show their protest against Nintendo and rename the game from "No Mario's Sky" to 'DMCA's Sky, ' to evade Nintendo's legal advisors. Just like many big technology companies, Nintendo sees its intellectual property rights as its most valuable asset. While there might be some copies of No Mario's Sky floating around, do be aware that not all of them might be harmless.

It is not the first time that the house of Kyoto rails against amateur projects, during the summer it also touched Pokemon Uranium and Project am2R by closing its doors after explicit request from Nintendo. But instead of setting the said game to run towards the sunset, ASMB Games - developer, has found a work around against Nintendo lawyers. As we've had to remove the game, we are voiding our entry into Ludum Dare.

"Thanks everyone for playing and enjoying our little fan game".

In No Mario's Sky, you played as Mario / Jumpman, searching for Princess Peach in a 2D, procedurally-generated universe full of angry Goombas.

However, after initial scare, ASMB chose to fight back and made a decision to relaunch the game as DMCA's Sky.

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