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MI governor denounces protestors with Confederate flags and swastikas

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Protesters trying to enter the Michigan House of Representative chamber on Thursday

The sight of crowds of anti-closure protesters, often unmasked, is "worrisome", said White House coronavirus task coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx said on Sunday.

Thursday's protests in MI followed the decision by the state's governor, Democrat Gretchen Whitmer, to extend stay-at-home orders, even as some states have begun the process of re-opening their economies. "So we need to protect each other at the same time we're voicing our discontent".

Asked whether it is safe for people to flock to beaches in California, Birx said that depended on proximity.

Ed Frederick made a decision to express his discontent with Governor Gretchen Whitmer after she announced an extension of the state's emergency lockdown order through 28 May.

Thursday's protest prompted a large group to gather inside the House chambers yelling at state police and House sergeants.

Gretchen Whitmer (D) told CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday that the protestors calling to reopen her state while bearing Nazi symbols and Confederate flags are "not representative of who we are in MI", denouncing them for celebrating "some of the worst racism and terrible parts of our history in this country".

Photos and video footage from inside showed elected officials wearing bulletproof vests, while protestors failed to practice social distancing.

"There were swastikas and Confederate flags and nooses and people with assault rifles", she said. The move led to protests across the state, with a group of people trying to storm the MI statehouse. Noting that people in his state "were not going to accept the government telling them what to do", the governor said his ability to communicate with Ohioans "was going to be really impeded". "What we have seen is for the last 35-40 days, we've been between 200 and 300 cases without a spike". This isn't something we just negotiate ourselves out of as a political matter.

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