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Hurricane Newton on path toward Mexico's border with Arizona

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A couple walks next to an advertisement toppled by Hurricane Newton in Cabo San Lucas Mexico Tuesday Sept. 6 2016. Hurricane Newton shattered windows downed trees and knocked out power in parts of the twin resorts of Los Cabos on Tuesday but resident

Firemen removed a palm tree felled by Hurricane Newton in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016.

Storm Newton is also forecast to bring hazardous sea conditions to coastal areas of Delaware, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island and MA until tomorrow.

As it deals with Newton, Cabo San Lucas still remembers the severe battering it took in 2014 when a stronger storm, Hurricane Odile, caused extensive damage.

A couple walks next to an advertisement toppled by Hurricane Newton in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Tuesday Sept. 6, 2016. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo) A man recovers belongings after the passing of Hurricane Newton in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Tuesday Sept. 6, 2016.

Tropical Storm Newton will bring unsafe flooding and mudslides to parts of northern Mexico, including in popular tourist locations in Baja California, through the middle of the week.

Flash flooding is also possible in eastern Baja California where localized amounts over 100 mm (4 inches) are possible Tuesday night into Wednesday.

At least two people died and three more went missing after their shrimp boat capsized in the Gulf of California during the storm.

Local airports closed late Monday, while small boats were barred from using the ports in case of a storm surge in low-lying areas areas. The storm system, which is near Mexico's Bahia Kino, has maximum sustained winds of 70 miles per hour and is moving north at a speed of 17 miles per hour.

Forecasters said it was on a projected path to the southern tip of Baja, where the twin resorts of Cabo San Lucas and San Jose del Cabo are located.

But the region, which is very popular with American and Canadian tourists, managed to escape major damage, two years after Hurricane Odile ravaged Los Cabos, killing six people and causing US$1 billion (RM4 billion) damage. "It was a rough one as you can see". But there was calm in the city as firefighters cleaned refuse from the streets during the day, and there were no reported casualties on land.

Some hotel windows broke, but 14,000 tourists in Los Cabos were "safe" in rooms made to shelter them, said state tourism secretary Genaro Ruiz Hernandez.

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