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Florida reports 8,942 new cases, shattering record yet again

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Ron De Santis wearing a suit and tie

Florida health officials on Saturday reported more than 9,500 new COVID-19 cases, surpassing the previous day's total by more than 600 confirmed cases.

With Friday's tally, Florida now has reported almost 123,000 coronavirus case, with more than 32,000 of them confirmed in just the last seven days.

The worsening contagion in the south and west comes as northern states, notably NY and its neighbours, which were hit hardest initially, have reported declining cases and have begun to forge ahead with reopening plans.

Total hospitalizations in Florida rose 1.5%, to 13,987.

At a press conference in Naples, Florida, DeSantis said the order was issued because many people were disobeying the state's reopening guidelines.

Based on available COVID-19 death data in Florida, which can lag some and be subject to retroactive updates, the daily number of COVID-19 deaths has remained flat in June, with the seven-day moving average hovering between 30 and 40. The new numbers broke Friday's single-day record, which was 8,942 new coronavirus cases.

Florida's daily death toll from the coronavirus is at 3,500.

And while several Miami-Dade cities are requiring people to wear masks in public, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis on Friday refused to make a statewide mandate.

Other misconceptions have been swirling around the surge's numbers, among them claims that the surge is not resulting in additional deaths or increased pressure on hospitals, or that, because a larger number of those infected are younger, the surge's consequences will not be as severe.

On Thursday, the state announced 5,996 new cases.

Hospitalizations for COVID-19 also are ticking upward statewide.

More information on a case-by-case basis can also be found here.

Experts say the true figure is undoubtedly higher.

The health department says it does not "have a figure" to reflect the number of people now hospitalized and only provides the total number of hospitalizations in its statewide and county-level data.

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