Entertainment

Facebook Messenger now lets you watch videos with friends

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Facebook introduces a co-viewing experience in Messenger ‘Watch Together’		
		
	Sarah Perez

			@sarahintampa	 
		7 hours

The service hooks into the Facebook Watch CDN (content distribution network) to pull the videos into Messenger. But Watch Together is meant to be more immersive than a Watch Party.

And in June, Amazon rolled out its own version, Watch Party, which lets up to 100 U.S. subscribers view a TV show or movie together. While watching the videos using the Watch Together feature there is a limit of eight people on a Messenger video call and a limit of fifty people in Rooms.

"We created Watch Collectively to make spending high quality time with mates and family members really feel as near an in-person expertise as potential", Facebook product supervisor Nora Micheva wrote in a weblog publish Monday.

To use the feature, you can either start a Messenger video call or create a Messenger Room, then swipe up and choose Watch Together.

"The social networking website has previewed new stipulations which are going to be released on October 1, even using music guidelines saying that users aren't allowed to use movies to" produce a listening experience".

The circumstances will proceed to use as an alternative to Fb users together with music in videos and live streams to which they don't own the copyright. Facebook Watch content is organized into categories like "TV & Movies", "Watched" (your recently watched content), "Uploaded" (your own videos) and "Suggested". Currently, on a daily basis, Messenger users make more than 150 million video calls in the app and send more than 200 videos. There is no option to watch videos from any external source.

Facebook is inaugurating Watch Together with a series of fitness videos by trainer Melissa Alcantara that users can work out together to virtually, a proven strategy to reaching fitness goals.

Initially, this feature is only available on iOS and Android mobile devices, Facebook says.

In the past six months, Hulu, Amazon, Twitch and Scener's HBO have each adopted similar watch-party features. "We want you to be able to share videos with your family and friends wherever they are, but any music in your video, if it is allowed at all, may not be available in all countries of the world".

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