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Dining Out Associated With High Risk of CCP Virus Infection: CDC

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News of the CDC’s report comes as restaurants continue their efforts top reopen in cities across the country. New York City for instance plans to re-allow indoor dining at 25% capacity by the end of the month

CDC personnel conducted interviews with more than 300 study participants, asking them about their mask-wearing habits, attending community gatherings, and activities in the last two weeks; including going to an office, salon, gym, bar/coffee shop, church, eating at a restaurant, or using public transportation.

The CDC report suggests that children can get COVID-19 and spread it, but don't appear to experience severe illness from the virus compared to adults.

According to the report, people who tested positive for the virus were twice as likely to have gone out to a dine-in restaurant than someone who tested negative.

Face mask usage was high among study participants, with 71% of participants testing positive and 74% of those testing negative saying they'd worn some sort of facial covering while out in public.

"Masks can not be effectively worn while eating and drinking, whereas shopping and numerous other indoor activities do not preclude mask use", the study says. The study initially recruited 802 people at or older than 18, but it was later narrowed to 314 people for the final sample size. "Testing of contacts of laboratory-confirmed Covid-19 cases in child care settings, including children who might not have symptoms, could improve control of transmission from child care attendees to family members".

Furthermore, the same patients who tested positive for COVID-19 were also the ones likely to have reported visiting a coffee shop or a bar. "Direction, ventilation, and intensity of airflow might affect virus transmission, even if social distancing measures and mask use are implemented according to current guidance", the study further states.

The study was carried out by CDC officials and researchers from other institutions. The participants did not have to specify whether they ate indoors or outdoors while dining, pointing that more research is required to establish whether the findings are going to similar to a larger group, as reported by the Business Insider.

"CDC to me appears to be writing hit pieces on the administration", Paul Alexander a senior adviser to Caputo wrote, calling on CDC director Robert Redfield to adjust two already published reports that Alexander claimed overstated the risks of coronavirus to children and undermined Trump's plan to reopen schools.

Dr. Kiva Fisher, lead author of the study, which looked at symptomatic outpatients from 11 US health care facilities, told ABC News that "exposures and activities that make it hard to wear masks and maintain social distancing, including going to locations that offer on-site eating and drinking, may be a risk factor for COVID-19".

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