Health

Democrats pound their message: To oust Trump, you must vote

Share
In this image from video Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris D-Calif. speaks about voting during the third night of the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday Aug. 19 2020

"Donald Trump hasn't grown into the job because he can't", Obama said, speaking from the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia, a backdrop chosen to reinforce what the former president sees as the dire stakes of the moment.

Kamala Harris, D-Calif., accepted the party's vice presidential nomination, and President Barack Obama offered his starkest rebuke yet of Trump's leadership.

She also praised Biden's vision for the nation, adding that "Donald Trump's failure of leadership has cost lives and livelihoods".

"There's a lot of heartbreak in America now, and the truth is, many things were broken before the pandemic", Clinton said. "But, as the saying goes, the world breaks everyone, and afterward, many are strong at the broken places. That's Joe Biden. He knows how to keep going, unify and lead, because he's done that for his family and his country".

Adrianne Shropshire, executive director of BlackPAC, which works to mobilize African American voters nationally, said Harris will necessarily stay focused on defeating Trump in November, not future presidential races.

He'll also give an interview to Fox News' Sean Hannity an hour before Biden addresses the Democratic National Convention, to formally accept the presidential nomination.

Harris, 55, a former prosecutor, is the fourth woman to be on a major USA party's national ticket, but the first Black woman and first South Asian American. Throughout the convention, Democrats have appealed directly to those women voters, highlighting Biden's co-sponsorship of the landmark Violence Against Women Act of 1994 and his proposals to bolster childcare and protect family healthcare provisions.

And While Warren urged people to vote for Biden and gave a hearty endorsement for several of his economic and child care plans, she hinted that she would not retreat from her push for a more progressive agenda should her party retake the White House. "She raised us to be proud, strong Black women, " Harris said.

Harris voiced hope that if elected, Biden would become "a president who turns our challenges into purpose" in contrast to Trump who she claimed "turns our tragedies into political weapons".

President Trump angrily retaliated at the accusations from his predecessor, telling reporters that Barack Obama was an "ineffective" and "terrible" leader.

'We have to get busy building it up - by pouring all our effort into these 76 days, and by voting like never before - for Joe and Kamala, and candidates up and down the ticket, so that we leave no doubt about what this country we love stands for - today and for all our days to come, ' said Obama, his hair gray and demeanor serious.

He blamed Trump for turning the presidency into a reality show in order "to get the attention he craves".

But the president will try to hit Biden where it will hurt the most - his own backyard - ahead of Biden's coronation as Democratic presidential nominee, an event that will surely dominate most of headlines and news cycle.

"This is the team to pull our nation back from the brink, but they can't do it without us", Clinton said. "This can't be another woulda, coulda, shoulda election". DeJoy said recently he would delay those changes until after the election. Take it from me.

Despite federal guidelines from April recommending that Americans wear face coverings in public to help fight the spread of coronavirus, the U.S. leader had not participated. "So we need numbers so overwhelming Trump can't sneak or steal his way to victory". And this fall voters must deal with concerns over the COVID-19 pandemic that has created health risks for those who want to vote in person - and postal slowdowns for mail-in ballots, which Democrats blame on Trump. The daughter of immigrants from Jamaica and India, Harris would be the first Black woman and first Asian American to serve as vice president. Kasich did not appear at the 2016 Republican National Convention held in Cleveland, Ohio, snubbing Trump.

Share