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Attorney General Calls Pensacola Naval Base Shooting An Act Of Terrorism

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Attorney General Calls Pensacola Naval Base Shooting An Act Of Terrorism

We were devastated to learn of the tragic terrorist attack on members of the United States armed services at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Florida on December 6th.

Barr says the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has been supporting the investigation which has not found evidence of pre-knowledge by the Suadi Royal Air Force or Royal Navy trainees.

Several news outlets, including CNN, Washington Post and the Associated Press, reported that more than a dozen Saudi servicemen who are training at US military bases will be expelled from the United States.

Barr added that Alshamrani also visited the New York City memorial to the victims of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the U.S. and posted anti-American, anti-Israeli and "jihadi messages" on social media, including two hours before the attack.

Three U.S. sailors were killed, and eight other Americans were severely wounded in the December shooting in Pensacola.

AS ZDNet reported this month, the Federal Bureau of Investigation had asked Apple to help unlock two iPhones that belonged to Alshamrani, who was shot dead. In 2015, United States law enforcement officials had asked Apple to unlock the iPhones of prime suspects in a shooting in California that had killed 14 people.

The episode marks the latest flare-up in a privacy debate between technology companies such as Apple and Facebook and authorities.

"The consensus was reached, after all efforts to access the shooter's phones had been unsuccessful, that the next step was to reach out to start a conversation with Apple".

Barr said evidence from the investigation shows Alshamrani was "motivated by jihadist ideology".

"Our responses to their many requests since the attack have been timely, thorough and are ongoing", the company said in a statement to Axios.

However, Apple now claims to have answered all questions from law enforcement officials regarding the Pensacola shooting and claims to have returned all of the information to which the company had access. The FBI got around Apple, by finding a private company able to unlock the iPhone's encryption, over Apple's objections.

Apple did not immediately respond to the Daily Caller News Foundation's request for comment.

"So far, Apple has not given any substantive assistance", Barr said.

Barr added: "We have asked Apple for help in unlocking the shooter's phones".

"It is very important to know with whom and about what the shooter was communicating before he died", but the devices are "engineered to make it virtually impossible to unlock them without the password", Barr said.

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