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Ungrateful Millennial Euromillions Winner Says Money 'Ruined' Her Life, Sues Game Organizers

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Jane Park

In 2013, Jane Park became Britain's youngest ever victor of a EuroMillions jackpot, but now nearly four years later she has been all over the news recently complaining about how scooping the money has made her an unhappier person.

She also gambles, two years ago winning £12,500 after betting £5,000 on Hibs to win a match.

She continued: "I have material things but apart from that my life is empty".

Jane adds that she is considering suing the lottery because of her unhappiness caused by the money she won. "The current age of 16 is far too young", says Park.

She said: 'I thought it would make it ten times better but it's made it ten times worse. "I was stuck in front of a financial adviser who was using words such as investment bonds".

Despite the fact that Camelot, which runs EuroMillions in the United Kingdom, appointed an adviser to help Ms Park deal with her newly accumulated wealth, she told Sunday People it was family advice that helped her keep tabs on her spending. Instead of finding happiness via conspicuous consumption, Park uncovered an age-old maxim preached by holy men for thousands of years and ignored by enthusiastic lottery winners for nearly as long: Money can't buy happiness, and large amounts of it have a way of, well, complicating things.

Park who won the Euromillions in 2013 has splashed out on breast implants, two properties and a chihuahua, but admitted she struggles to find objective in life.

In any case, she has apparently now changed her mind about bringing a lawsuit against the organization, which is just as well as it would have had very little chance of success in the UK.

"At times it feels like winning the lottery has ruined my life".

But said: "It's scary how different my life is from my friends". An independent financial and legal panel was set up shortly after her win and we put Jane in touch with another victor who won at the same age, to share their experience and help Jane adjust to the win.

"We keep in contact with all major winners for as long as they wish and have been in touch with Jane from time to time since her win to offer ongoing support", explained the operator.

"An independent financial and legal panel was set up shortly after her win, and we put Jane in touch with another victor who won at the same age, to share their experience and help Jane adjust to the win".

People envied her lifestyle and cash but it was nothing worth lusting after, she said.

"Our role is to offer tailored and specific advice and support to any victor, no matter their age", the spokeswoman said.

Parks claims that Camelot should never have allowed someone of her age to win such an extortionate amount of money, and is now calling for the minimum age for winning to be raised from 16 to 18. Ms Park, now 21, argued 18 should be the minimum age to win. "I had no clue what they meant".

Camelot also said it is up to parliament to decide when someone can legally play the lottery.

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