World Media

Trump calls on Saudi Arabia to lift Yemen blockade

Share
В Йемене убили бывшего президента

President Donald Trump called on Saudi Arabia to end its blockade of supplies to Yemen "immediately".

Trump said in a statement Wednesday he has asked USA officials "to call the leadership of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to request that they completely allow food, fuel, water, and medicine to reach the Yemeni people who desperately need it". "This must be done for humanitarian reasons immediately". Roughly 8 million Yemenis are starving, and many are suffering from outbreaks of cholera and diphtheria.

Since the air strikes began, at least 10,000 people have died as a result and 40,000 have been wounded, Al Jazeera reported.

Saleh was killed on Monday after he tried to break off the alliance with the Houthis and negotiate with the Saudi coalition.

USA support for the Saudi-led campaign includes selling the Saudis weapons, providing limited intelligence and helping with logistics such as air refueling.

The ICRC has appealed for "bold measures" to provide life-saving care to civilians after the "unprecedented" escalation of fighting. I've got numbers of senators coming up to me often with concerns about how Saudi is dealing with humanitarian concerns in Yemen.

President Trump on Wednesday said he's directed his administration to push Saudi Arabia to completely lift a month-old blockade on war-torn Yemen.

"We're living in a state of fear".

"Hospitals in Sanaa use fuel for generators that are their only source of electricity", said Iolanda Jacquemet, a spokeswoman for the Red Cross.

America has supported the coalition through weapons sales, air-to-air refueling of jets and some limited intelligence sharing.

"The past month's escalation has killed thousands and condemned thousands more to die in the near future". The president's statement appeared to be a veiled criticism of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman, who has led the kingdom's campaign in Yemen and has been publicly praised by Trump for his efforts to clamp down on terrorism and corruption. The move comes a day after the United Nations called for a ceasefire.

Share