World Media

Speaker Ryan Dismisses Trump’s Charges of a Spy in his Campaign

Share
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan R-Wis. meets with reporters during his weekly news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Ryan is agreeing with another senior House Republican who says there's no evidence that the FBI plan

"I think chairman Gowdy's initial assessment is accurate", Ryan said, but then also offered support for House Intelligence Committee chair Devin Nunes' ongoing investigation into the Justice Department.

Ryan also noted that he has seen no evidence of collusion between Russian Federation and the Trump campaign, which special counsel Robert Mueller is investigating.

The Senate Intelligence Committee agreed to provide records in response to a request from the Justice Department, and the Senate on Wednesday passed a resolution allowing it to do so. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said after the briefing that he learned "nothing particularly surprising".

He claims the Obama administration planted "eyes and ears" in his campaign team to help Hillary Clinton win the election. During a press briefing last week, Press Secretary Sarah Sanders responded to Gowdy's comments by saying "clearly, there's still cause for concern that needs to be looked at". "We still have some unanswered questions", Ryan said. Ryan, R-Wisc., is one of three congressional Republicans who have now contradicted Trump on the spying matter, including House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., and Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C.

The Justice Department and Federal Bureau of Investigation believe they "can provide information that is directly responsive to congressional inquiries in a manner that is consistent with its national security and law enforcement responsibilities, and is pleased to do so", the department official said in a statement.

Trump, without offering any evidence, has repeatedly alleged on Twitter that the Justice Department planted a spy inside his presidential campaign. This was disputed by Ryan and two other Republicans who have been briefed on the FBI's use of an informant at the time.

"But I have seen no evidence to the contrary of the initial assessment that Chairman Gowdy has made", Ryan continued, adding: "But I want to make sure that we run every lead down and make sure we get final answers to these questions".

His comments prompted a wave of push back from Trump allies, including the president's personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, who called him "uninformed".

"The evidence I've seen gave plenty of damn good reasons", Swalwell said. "They were too close to the Russians".

The investigation has so far made no allegations against the president himself.

"You've just confirmed whatever Republican leaders say you believe".

On Monday the president wrote in a tweet: "As has been stated by numerous legal scholars, I have the absolute right to PARDON myself, but why would I do that when I have done nothing wrong?"

Share