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SpaceX launches mega rocket, lands all 3 boosters

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This still image from video courtesy of SpaceX shows the SpaceX Falcon Heavy Rocket lifting off from Kennedy Space Center in Florida

SpaceX confirmed this evening that the Arabsat-6A satellite, which will be used for communications, was successfully transferred into geosynchronous orbit.

Falcon Heavy is created to launch large commercial payloads into high orbits, take on heavy-duty national security missions and potentially power interplanetary missions as well.

The center core booster landed on a floating platform in the Atlantic Ocean about two minutes after that.

The first Falcon Heavy's central core missed its landing at the end of last year's mission, due to the fact that it ran out of ignition fluid before the final engine burn.

The Arabsat-6A satellite deployed from the rocket's second-stage about 34 minutes after liftoff.

Musk's SpaceX, working to prove the flight-worthiness of its rocket fleet one mission at a time, aims to clinch one-third of all US National Security Space missions - coveted contracts that are worth billions of dollars.

A standard Falcon Heavy launch costs $90 million, according to the company's website, compared to $62 million for the Falcon 9.

Until SpaceX came along, rocket boosters were usually discarded in the ocean after satellite launches.

Falcon Heavy has already been chosen for a few contracts, including a $130 million contract to launch an Air Force satellite that was awarded just four months after its inaugural flight in February 2018.

It consists of the equivalent of three Falcon 9 rockets combined, tripling its thrust. The red Roadster - with a mannequin at the wheel - remains in a solar orbit stretching just past Mars. All three of the rocket's boosters safely landed on Earth; the side boosters for this launch hadn't previously been used. Before the rocket finally launched more than two years later, Musk suggested to several news outlets, including CNN, that the rocket could explode. As before, the launch could take place at any time over a window of about three hours, but if SpaceX does indeed manage to launch its massive rocket today you'll be able to watch it live right here.

Falcon Heavy is not expected to fly almost as often as its smaller counterpart, which has completed more than 20 missions since last February.

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