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Scott suggests Trump be careful on race

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S. Carolina Sen. Tim Scott to discuss Charlottesville response with Trump

Congress has passed a resolution condemning white supremacists but it is unknown if Donald Trump will sign it. I think especially in light of the advent of Antifa, if you look at what's going on there.

"The real picture has nothing to do with who is on the other side", Scott said, the New York Times reported.

In the aftermath of the president's response, the South Carolina Republican was critical of the president, saying "clarity and moral authority" from the man in the Oval Office were necessary, but after Trump's comments laying blame on both groups "that moral authority is compromised".

The offense occurred Wednesday during a meeting with Sen.

After the violent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia last month, many Republican lawmakers condemned white supremacists and neo-Nazi groups, but they stopped short of criticizing President Trump by name when he failed to do the same.

In addition to noting the deaths of Heather Heyer, Lt. H. Jay Cullen and Trooper Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, the resolution recognizes "several other individuals who were injured in separate attacks while standing up to hate and intolerance".

Scott has made no secret of his desire for the President to become more engaged on this topic.

"He shook his head and said, 'Yeah, I got it, ' " recalled the Charleston Republican.

Scott, who has served in the Senate since 2013, said he was "surprised" at the amount of attention that surrounded his sit-down with the president.

The president also met with Sen. Graham's demand provoked a Twitter response from Trump. "I shared my thoughts of the last three centuries of challenges from white supremacists, white nationalists, KKK, Nazis. The people of SC will remember!" In his discussion with Sanders about the incident, Scott recommended a sit-down meeting. After that critique, Scott said the White House called him, asking what could be done in light of his critiques.

"They talked about it pretty in depth, but the focus was primarily on solutions moving forward", Sanders said. The White House's caption misidentified him as Tom Scott, rather than Tim.

"He and the senator talked about that and discussed that, and agreed that that was the appropriate place to be", Sanders said. In the interview, Scott speaks about Trump's comments as well as discrimination and opportunity in the U.S.

As the only black Republican in the Senate and the first African-American elected to statewide office in SC since Reconstruction, Scott's perspective has drawn acute attention in the aftermath of the Charlottesville incident.

The topic of the conversation is race relations in America, especially after what happened in Charlottesville, Virginia.

"I think that will be an ongoing process", she said.

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