Research

Yes, Comet Lovejoy Is Emitting Alcohol Into Space

New research published Friday in the journal Science Advances suggests that the boozy space rock is releasing the equivalent of 500 bottles of wine per second. According to NASA the appearance and proximity of Lovejoy make it unusual as most comets orbit far away from the sun in cold. The present-day comets may provide an important snapshot of what the rocky bodies were carrying during the early days of the solar system.

Research

Stunning Image of Starbust Caught By Hubble Space Telescope

The arrangement of the spiral arms in the galaxy Messier 63, seen here in a new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, recall the pattern at the center of a sunflower. A gravitational lens refers to a distribution of matter, such as cluster of galaxies, between the light source and an observer. This is around the time when stars began to form into clusters and formed the first galaxies.

Research

Nissan Altima Priced at $23325

After announcing its production start, Nissan is now placing the 2016 Altima into the spotlights once again, this time with the company releasing the first info on its pricing list. The 2016 Altima touts several improvements over its predecessor, including Siri Eyes Free, NissanConnect with Mobile Apps and an available 7-inch display screen.

Research

Nasa's Cassini to sample Saturn moon's ocean

NASA's Cassini spacecraft will take the deepest dive ever through the plume of Saturn's moon Enceladus . The porous nature of the core means that it would probably lose heat rapidly and this suggests that a recent "incidental heating" event may be responsible.

Research

Man-made space object set to hit Earth soon

This piece of junk, dubbed as WT1190F or WTF, is moving at a very high speed and will crash into Indian Ocean in middle of next month. Unofficially, however, its name has been appropriately shortened to "WTF." The European Space Agency said in a release that it believes the object is a discarded rocket body .

Research

Biologists plot ancient ecosystem with massive super predators

Moreover, when they gathered in packs the animals would have terminated a 9-year-old mastodon that weighed up to 2 tons. Leading the other researchers, a UCLA evolutionary biologist, Blaire Van Valkenburgh, that the lions of this age were much larger than those of today, and so were able to attack and kill a number of giant ground sloths and mastodons among others; and this prevented the large herbivores from overrunning the Pleistocene ecosystem which ended almost 11,700 years ago.


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