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President Trump prompts state of confusion over space policy with tweet

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US President Donald Trump and US First Lady Melania Trump attend the French-US ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer Normandy northwestern France

Speaking in April, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said "this time, when we go to the Moon, we're actually going to stay". "They must be centered on the remarkable bigger things we're doing, at the side of Mars (of which the Moon is a half), Protection and Science!"

"It is the stated policy of this administration and the United States of America to return American astronauts to the moon within the next five years", Vice President Mike Pence declared in March as the administration shortened the timeline for the moon return, directing NASA to shoot for 2024.

He further commented saying that "moon is a part of Mars" and was trolled on the internet.

This wouldn't be the first time the soft-brained president made a freaky public proclamation after listening to criticism from a Fox News talking head, but at least he didn't threaten to shut down the government this time.

Cavuto asked why NASA is "refocusing on the moon...didn't we do this moon thing quite a few decades ago?"

US President Donald Trump has called the moon part of Mars in a tweet.

At the end of his first year as president, Trump authorized NASA to "lead an innovative space exploration program to send American astronauts back to the moon, and eventually Mars".

Trump's tweet was an about-face from a post on May 13 in which he expressed great pride in sending NASA back to the moon. "This time, we will not only plant our flag and leave our footprints - we will establish a foundation for an eventual mission to Mars, and perhaps someday, to many worlds beyond".

President Donald Trump sparked a Twitter uproar on Friday with a confusingly-phrased tweet that initially gave the impression he believed the moon was part of Mars.

Meanwhile, Trump had last month announced that he was adding $1.6 billion to NASA's budget "so that we can return to Space in a BIG WAY!" NASA has been energized by the lunar return mission, but the price now seems a possible threat to other NASA programs.

The leading theory is that a collision between Earth and a planet-sized entity, many years ago, resulted in debris that eventually became the moon.

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