World Media

'Pokemon Go' Gamers Are Banned From Locations For A Suitable Reason

Share

"It's a place of peace and prayer and reflection and it's just not appropriate to play the Pokemon game there, so we're asking those Pokemon hunters to go elsewhere", Kunich said. "But you can mention it to them that this is not where you play games".

For Valerie Janovic, a 19-year-old psychology major at Brandeis University, the game went too far when the image of a poison-gas-emitting pocket monster called "Koffing" was pictured near the U.S. Holocaust museum's exhibit on World War II gas chamber victims.

"Pokemon GO" has become a sensation following its release earlier this month, simultaneously generating intense interest from users even as it has sparked controversy due to both the privacy concerns and the presence of characters in locations deemed inappropriate.

The premise is simple: The player's digital avatar has to collect Pokemon, but to do so, the play has to explore the actual world as the virtual Pokemon world has been overlaid atop it using Google Maps data.

The L.A. National Cemetery also says they strongly prohibit using the app, telling us they don't allow any recreational activity.

Playing the game at the Holocaust museum and Auschwitz has brought a strong response on Twitter.

Other hallowed locations where players are hunting Pokemon include Auschwitz Museum, Poland, Washington's Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, the 9/11 Memorial in New York City, and several other monuments in national parks.

Ryan Calo, a University of Washington law professor, said private property owners may adopt a "Pokemon No Go" policy and bar players from physically entering their building or grounds.

He wrote in a direct message to CNNMoney that creating Pokestops in memorials is "absolutely inappropriate".

He added that the makers of the game had already been contacted, and asked "not to allow the site of Auschwitz Memorial and other similar sites to be included in the game".

Will Site Removal Affect Game's Popularity?

While the allure of "catching 'em all" is indeed a real one for players, sensitive situations like these will arise.

But Samara Hutman, executive director at the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, said the removal process appears to be swift. She said it took about an hour for the museum to be removed as a hotspot.

Share