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Palestinians and Israeli police clash at Jerusalem holy site

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Israeli soldiers stand guard during a house-to-house search operation in the West Bank village of Beit Fajjar near Bethlehem

Azzam Khateeb, the Waqf's director, said Sunday's altercation proved that "Israeli ambitions in the mosque are not limited to the extreme right-wing groups, but also to the Israeli government".

Israeli police and Palestinian worshippers have clashed at a flashpoint Jerusalem holy site as overlapping Jewish and Muslim holidays led to tensions there. Israel's Kan public radio said four police officers were injured.

Israeli police deployed tear gas and riot control weapons against Muslim worshipers at the Jerusalem Holy site of Temple Mount on Sunday.

Revered by Jews as Temple Mount, the site of two biblical Jewish temples, and by Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, the area is one of the most sensitive sites in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Clashes arose after authorities allowed hundreds of religious Israeli Jews to enter the holy site of Al-Aqsa for prayer during Eid.

Earlier on August 1, a Palestinian seeking to avenge his brother's death by Israeli fire entered Israel from Gaza and opened fire on soldiers, the army said.

Israeli police barred entry to the compound to Jewish visitors on Sunday before clashes erupted. The Palestinians want those territories to form their future state, with east Jerusalem as their capital.

It is located in east Jerusalem, occupied by Israel in the 1967 Six-Day War and later annexed in a move never recognised by the worldwide community.

Tensions have spiked since Donald Trump's decision in 2017 to break with worldwide convention and recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital and move the United States embassy there.

The Israeli military said it fatally shot four armed Palestinians Saturday and another man on Sunday.

The Palestinian Health Ministry in Gaza identified the deceased as 26-year-old Marwan Nasser. Hamas, which has ruled Gaza since 2007, said the attack was an "individual act" carried out by youths frustrated at the Israeli-Egyptian blockade on Gaza and was not planned by the group.

No Palestinian group claimed responsibility.

Associated Press writer Fares Akram in Gaza City, Gaza Strip contributed.

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