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North Korea's Kim lands in Singapore ahead of summit with Trump

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Kim Jong Un poses for a selfie with Singapore Foreign Minister Vivian Balakrishnan and Education Minister Ong Ye Kung.

Kim held a meeting with Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong ahead of the planned summit.

Kim's sister gained notoriety during the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea in February, where she met with South Korean President Moon Jae-in.

The Singapore government offered itself as a neutral site for the first-ever meeting between a sitting USA president and a North Korean leader.

DPRK is the acronym for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the North's formal name.

Kim Yo-jong, Kim Jong-un's sister is also in Singapore. They will be joined only by translators and will spend a couple of hours before admitting their close advisers to the meeting.

The meeting between Kim and Trump will mark a turnaround of relations between the two leaders after a long-running exchange of furious threats and insults.

An aviation source in China said that "It probably cost a lot of money as well as representing a huge political burden to loan Kim the aircraft", the publication Chosun Ilbo reported.

On Monday, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo suggested U.S. sanctions and other global pressure will continue until North Korea takes steps toward denuclearization. "I feel that Kim Jong Un wants to do something great for his people and he has that opportunity".

Reclusive North Korean leader Kim Jong-un went on an evening tour of Singapore on Monday, posing with city-state officials at a tropical garden before visiting an infinity pool atop a landmark waterfront hotel, to the surprise of guests.

But last month, Trump abruptly cancelled the Singapore summit, citing the "tremendous anger and open hostility" by Pyongyang.

Kim had landed in Singapore hours earlier, staying silent as he has since Trump announced he had rescheduled the once-cancelled meeting set for Tuesday morning local time (prime time Monday in the United States).

Experts believe the North is close to being able to target the entire US mainland with its nuclear-armed missiles, and while there's deep skepticism that Kim will quickly give up those hard-won nukes, there's also some hope that diplomacy can replace the animosity between the USA and the North.

He's also repeatedly expressed his support for a meeting between Trump and Kim - even offering to facilitate it or serve as an ambassador of sorts. Trump had previously said the talks might extend beyond the first day.

Kim, on the other hand, has shown he is prepared for his moment on the world stage, and could end up outfoxing Trump, said Victor Cha, a senior adviser and Korea Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.

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