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Nissan, DeNA unveil Easy Ride robo-vehicle mobility service in Japan

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In January 2017 both companies have collaborated to develop a new mobility based on an autonomous driving technology

The self-driving taxi service, known as Easy Ride, is said to be the first test to take place in Japan's coastal city of Yokohama, and Nissan will work with DeNA, a technology company that develops healthcare, gaming and auto networking services.

Nissan and DeNA started a technical field test using an autonomous vehicle this year.

Four years ago, Nissan Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn had ambition to launch Nissian's autopilot vehicle by 2020. An earlier version of the technology was tested in London at the start of 2017.

In Japan, Nissan models including the Serena minivan, the X-Trail SUV and the new Leaf electric vehicle are gaining popularity due to their semi-autonomous features including single-lane diving and auto parking, said Bloomberg.

Global automakers are looking beyond making and selling cars to survive an industry which is being quickly transformed by new services, and a growing number including General Motors Co are applying their expertise in automated driving functions for mass-market cars to develop mobility services.

The trial will run from March 5 to 18 and sees Nissan partnering with Japanese software firm DeNA.

Nissan Motor Company is expected to roll out its self-driving cars by 2o22.

Called Easy Ride, the vehicles will work alongside a mobile app that enables users to hail one of the cars as and when they need one. And the APP cannot only enable users to set a destination, but also provide passengers information about nearby restaurants, hotels and other service information, allowing users to set driving directions.

Elsewhere, DeNA has also been working on the rollout of self-driving shuttle buses in ritual communities - with the idea being that such services could be used to provide transportation for elderly residents in such locations. It's noteworthy here, though, that the two companies have actually been performing field testing of their "Easy Ride" system since earlier this year. Please share your opinion in the comment section below.

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