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Most Republicans want Trump to 'break some rules to set things right'

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Most Republicans want Trump to 'break some rules to set things right'

On Monday night, while on the Sirius XM show Bannon has rejoined following his stint as President Donald Trump's chief strategist, Hannity doubled down on his vitriol toward the GOP while discussing the party's failure to repeal Obamacare. However, just 37% of registered voters surveyed say they'll support a Republicans congressional candidate in the midterm elections next year.

"What struck me is that Trump supposedly got 81 percent of the white evangelical vote and he now has 72 percent approval, which means that white evangelicals are still tracking roughly what they voted", Henry Olsen, a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, said after participating in a panel discussion about the newly released survey. Many good men and women. Mainline Protestant denominations and white Catholics are divided with 49% of both groups approving of Trump's performance during his first year in office. But Trump retains significant support among rank-and-file Republicans and white evangelical Protestants.

Almost a third of Republicans say they would prefer a candidate other than Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDems resurface Flynn's "lock her up" comments after Mueller charges Congress must stop private prisons from receiving tax breaks Evangelicals were with Trump in 2016, and will be in 2020 MORE to represent the party in the 2020 presidential election, new data shows. Eighty-four percent of Republicans, including more than nine in ten "strong" Republicans (91 percent), approve of the job Trump is doing as president.

"Here's my view on the Republican Party", Hannity said.

Hannity said he expects such anger to continue to grow. Democrats hold similarly negative attitudes toward Republicans: Most Democrats (54 percent) feel GOP policies pose a threat to the country, while 38 percent believe they are simply misguided.

PRRI is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit, nonpartisan organization specializing in research at the intersection of religion, values, and public life.

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