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May steps down as Conservative leader

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Newly elected Labour MP Lisa Forbes gives her speech

Conservative Prime Minister Theresa May is set to step officially down from her role as party leader today.

The reason I would say that; is because the new European Union Parliament, and everything around it, all the commissioners etcetera, they are all going to have to be appointed between the 2 July, and effectively the 31 October.

May leaves just shy of exactly three years as party leader.

When asked about losing the Peterborough by-election in which his party's candidate came a close second to Labour, Mr Farage said: "Did we?"

She will continue to work as prime minister until her party elects a new leader, a crowded race that will be defined by Brexit and competing approaches on how to deliver Britain's biggest policy shift in more than 40 years.

The right-populist politician maintained on the campaign trail ahead of the European Parliament election last month that the Brexit Party will not only seek to ensure that the United Kingdom leaves the EU, but will "change politics for good" and lead a "peaceful revolution" to overturn the establishment political system which he describes as "rotten to the core".

She survived a no-confidence vote, the resignations of a string of high-profile Brexit supporters, notably former foreign secretary Boris Johnson, and has endured constant sniping from MPs on the sidelines.

"This result shows that in spite of the divisions and deadlock over Brexit, when it comes to a vote on the issues that directly affect people's lives, Labour's case for real change has strong support across the country", said Corbyn.

His party is ready to face a general election, he said. No official event took place and there was no statement from her 10 Downing Street office.

Nominations for the contest must be submitted on Monday, and the 313 Conservative MPs - including Mrs May - will hold the first of a series of secret ballots on June 13.

Other leading contenders include the current foreign minister, Jeremy Hunt, and environment minister Michael Gove, who take a less hardline stance on Brexit.

With the worst performers eliminated each time, the goal is to have two candidates left by June 20.

British Prime Minister Theresa May's time as Conservative Party leader ended today, not with a bang but a whimper.

The party slumped to fifth place with just 9.3% of the vote, lost both its MEPs and saw two frontbenchers - Neil Findlay and Daniel Johnson - resign.

The front-runner, Boris Johnson, has warned that the Conservatives face "extinction" if Britain doesn't leave the European Union on Oct 31.

"She remains prime minister for a good few weeks yet", Ms May's spokesman insisted, noting that any successor must meet Queen Elizabeth II and assure the monarch they have the support of enough lawmakers to take over. Even as the Brexit saga has dragged on and the pressure of a potentially disastrous "no deal" Brexit mounted, no European leader has publicly shown an appetite for renegotiating any part of the 585-page text.

Farage had clearly thought Peterborough would mark a triumphant entry for the Brexit Party into the House of Commons.

The poll in the eastern English city of Peterborough was triggered after the sitting MP, Fiona Onasanya, was dumped by voters after being jailed for lying over a speeding offence. "I look back and I think I wish I hadn't done that", he said.

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