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Japan's passport best for travel, Taiwan's rallies

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Japan has the strongest passport in the world according to new Henley & Partners ranking

The Henley Passport Index ranks passports according to their travel power using data from the International Air Transport Association. We aren't in the top 10, or even the top 50.

Having gained visa-free access to Myanmar earlier this month, Japanese citizens can now enjoy visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to a whopping 190 destinations around the world - knocking Singapore, with 189 destinations, into second place.

Germany, another country to hold the top spot in previous years, is now in third place alongside South Korea and France.

According to its website, Henley Passport Index ranks all passports in the world based on the number of countries its holders can visit visa-free.

However, South Africa still ranks 3rd in Africa, after the Seychelles (25th strongest passport in the world, with 152 destinations) and Mauritius (31st strongest passport in the world, with 146 destinations).

The latest report also showed that US and the United Kingdom passports, both with 186 visa-free destinations, fell one spot from fourth to the fifth place after failing to gain access to new destinations.

But where's our very own Philippines?

The ranking determines how many countries the holder can enter either without a visa or be issued one upon entry. Russia's recent decision to grant visa-free travel access to not only Emiratis but also citizens of several other nations speaks to this effort.

VISA-FREE TRAVEL? The Philippines, unfortunately, isn't as lucky as its Asian neighbors. The same is true of China: Chinese nationals obtained access to two new jurisdictions (St. Lucia and Myanmar), but the Chinese passport fell two places, to 71st overall.

Many ranking spots are shared by multiple countries with access to the same number of destinations.

Japan has overtaken Singapore in terms of the most powerful passport.

What's the point of the ranking, you may ask?

"As the world economy has become increasingly globalised, the need for greater visa-free access has grown steadily", said the Henley Passport Index report.

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