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Indonesia church attacks kill nine, dozens wounded

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Television images showed debris scattered around the entrance of one church and police cordoning off areas as crowds gathered

Suicide bombers suspected to be from an Islamic State-inspired group killed at least nine people and wounded 40 in attacks on Christians attending Sunday morning services at three churches in Indonesia's second-largest city of Surabaya, security officials said.

Frans Barung, a spokesman for East Java's police, said one churchgoer was killed and 11 people suffered injuries.

Debris are seen outside Santa Maria church where an explosion went off in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, Sunday.

Three separate locations were hit by the bombings around 7:30 a.m. (0030 GMT).

Media reports said a woman with a younger child and a teenager had just entered one church and was being questioned by security when the bomb exploded.

The latest attacks in predominantly Muslim Indonesia came days after police ended a riot and hostage-taking at a detention center near Jakarta that left five dead and five injured. The Daesh terror group had claimed responsibility. Almost 90 percent of Indonesians are Muslim, but the country is also home to sizeable communities of Hindus, Christians, Buddhists, and people who adhere to traditional beliefs.

Indonesian police shot and wounded a man who attacked a church congregation in the town of Sleman with a sword during a Sunday mass in February. Resulting in four people were killed, including an alleged terrorist.

Indonesia has carried out a sustained crackdown on militants since bombings by Al Qaeda-affiliated radicals in Bali in 2002 killed 202 people.

A sustained crackdown weakened the most unsafe networks but the emergence of IS has proved a potent new rallying cry for radicals.

Dozens of others were injured in the attacks, which occurred within minutes of each other. As a result of this attack also killed two people.

Seven people were killed, six of them foreigners, and more than 40 were injured when suicide bombers targeted the luxury Ritz-Carlton and JW Marriott hotels in Jakarta in July 2009.

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