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Independence referendum 'no bluff' Scotland warns UK

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Nicola Sturgeon Scotland 'not bluffing' on second independence referendum

She went on to say that she felt Theresa May has no plan and that she, "I don't feel as if I know any more about her (Theresa May's) negotiating objectives than I did six months ago".

"And that's the case that in those circumstances I think it would be right for Scotland to have the opportunity to decide".

Sturgeon's offer to put aside Scottish Independence in favour of a soft Brexit, her calls for independence will be strengthened should the United Kingdom go for a hard Brexit.

Nicola Sturgeon has warned Theresa May that she is not "bluffing" on the promise of a second independence referendum if Scotland is "driven off a hard Brexit cliff".

Scotland is now consulting on a draft bill for a second independence referendum.

She insisted on the Marr show on Sunday that this proposition would allow May to honour her promise to English voters to quit the European Union while allowing Scotland to keep the far closer ties to the bloc it voted for in the June referendum.

Yet she added: "But let me not get away from this point, I'm putting to Theresa May a compromise solution".

The Scottish government has published a document on why staying in the single market is important as well as solutions if the United Kingdom opts to leave the single market - such as retaining controls on immigration.

A spokesman for the UK Government reiterated its position that it was committed to a deal "that works for all parts of the UK, including Scotland".

"I came out of that meeting more frustrated, after a meeting of that nature, than I have ever been before".

With about a third of SNP voters opposed to European Union membership, Sturgeon's opponents say she faces a significant challenge to win a second independence vote.

She is due to confirm in a speech later this month that the United Kingdom will have two fundamental "red lines" in its Brexit negotiations - control of its borders and freedom from the European Court of Justice.

Talking on the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, Sturgeon claimed the Government was "making a big mistake if they think that I'm in any way bluffing" as June 23 vote had sparked a "fundamental question" about Scotland's place in the world.

The Hollyrood leader met with the Chief Minister in London previous year to discuss common ground as both Scotland and Gibraltar voted in favour of remaining in the European Union.

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