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Hurricane Jose 'quickly strengthening' in the Atlantic, forecasters say

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New: Tropical Storm Jose forms east of Hurricane Irma

Describing Katia as a "small tropical cyclone", the NHC said the storm would likely start drifting towards the southwest on Thursday, taking it towards the Mexican coast.

The Category 3 storm had maximum sustained winds of 120 miles per hour and could strengthen on Friday, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The storm was named on Tuesday, and became a hurricane Wednesday afternoon when its winds hit 75 miles per hour. Katia has developed in the Gulf of Mexico.

Irma is expected to hug the Florida coast, but even if it doesn't make landfall, it could still do lots of damage.

This development comes even as many Caribbean islands brace for the impact of Irma, now a Category 5 hurricane, with 175 miles per hour winds. "But the Leeward Islands would end up with another one-two punch ..." Storms of Category 3 and above are defined as major hurricanes.

Hurricane Irma may be getting most of the headlines right now, but it's sharing the Atlantic with Hurricane Jose and newly formed Hurricane Katia, too. The storm strengthened to a hurricane by Wednesday evening. It posed no immediate threat to land, the National Hurricane Center said, but it noted the path could change at any moment.

Earlier: Emergency attempts to reach Caribbean island communities devastated by Hurricane Irma could be affected by a second major storm threatening the region. Prime Minister Gaston Browne said it's possible a mandatory evacuation may be ordered by Friday.

If the storm tracks over the beleaguered islands of the northern Lesser Antilles, they could face destructive winds for the second time in four days and up to 10 inches of rainfall.

As for the three storms now occupying the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico, all three are expected to take very different paths.

Katia is anticipated to pass over Mexico, dumping heavy rain over the states of Veracruz, Tamaulipas and Puebla.

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