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Historic Discovery: 7000-Year-Old Lost City Unearthed In Egypt!

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Historic Discovery: 7000-Year-Old Lost City Unearthed In Egypt!

It is believed the city was home to important officials and tomb builders and would have flourished during early-era ancient Egyptian times.

As the city of Abydos was founded by predynastic rulers and is famed for its temples such as that of Seti I and its graves, researchers believe the city and cemetery were likely home to high-ranking officials and grave builders.

Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered a city and cemetery-dating back more than 7,000 years to its First Dynasty-in the southern province of Sohag. Photo / The discovery of the ancient Egyptian city and graveyard was made in Abydos.

The ancient city is near present day Luxor across the Nile and is located 400 meters away from the Mortuary Temple of Seti I, a period memorial that belongs to the New Kingdom period.

Historic Discovery: 7000-Year-Old Lost City Unearthed In Egypt!

So far, the things in sight are iron tools, open huts and pottery remnants together with 15 graves. The remains of pottery and stone tools suggest that the city supplied the labor force involved in the building of royal tombs with food and drink.

BBC Middle East analyst Alan Johnston says that the discovery of the ancient cemetery is important for modern archaeology as well as for Egypt's tourism.

Yasser Mahmoud, the mission's field director, said that the uncovered tombs have a unique architectural design and one or more mastaba - distinguished by flat roofs and sloping sides - known only for pharaohs from the First and Third Dynasties at the Saqqara Necropolis.

Egypt's tourism industry dropped from 14.7 million tourists in 2010 to 9.8 million in 2011 after the uprising. In the first quarter of 2016, Egypt only managed to attract 1.2 million tourists - a shocking decrease from last year's 2.2 million. The discovery could mean a renewed interest in sightseeing for Egypt, especially as more information is learned about the site and its history.

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