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First two Muslim women elected to US Congress: networks

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Rashida Tlaib

Ellison was the first Muslim elected to Congress. Multiple outlets have called the race.

Tlaib was a shoo-in for the Detroit area 13th district after she won the Democratic primary in August.

A fighter who once heckled US President Donald Trump during a 2016 campaign stop in Detroit, she says she didn't run to make history as Muslim.

Fresh off her victory as the first refugee, the first Somali-American, and one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress, Democrat Ilhan Omar said Wednesday that she is going to Washington to help "serve as a check on the rhetoric of fear and division".

As of 9:46 p.m. on November 6, media outlets have also declared Andy Levin, Debbie Dingell, and Brenda Lawrence winners in their respective U.S. House races.

Technically, Palestinian-American Rashida Harbi Tlaib is the first American Muslim woman to be elected to Congress.

Rashida is also the first Palestinian-American woman in Congress. A proud Palestinian, Tlaib has also been an advocate for Palestinian rights and is an outspoken critic of Trump. It is open, with the seat being vacated by Rep. Keith Ellison, who is running for Minnesota Attorney General. Her parents were both born in Palestine.

Tlaib's relatives in the West Bank village of Beit Ur Al-Fauqa greeted the news of her election with a mixture of pride and hope that she would be able to take on a USA administration widely seen as hostile to Muslims and the Palestinian cause.

Tlaib supports the anti-Semitic BDS (Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions) movement against the state of Israel, which seeks to delegitimize and eventually extinguish the Jewish state.

And regardless of who wins in Arizona's competitive Senate race, the state will elect either Republican Martha McSally or Democrat Kyrsten Sinema as the state's first woman to serve in the chamber.

The result of the elections means that the Republicans no longer hold both wings of the USA congress, handing President Donald Trump's political opponents a stronger foothold in Washington.

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