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Early Australians lived alongside giant killer lizards

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Early Australians lived alongside giant killer lizards

University of Queensland palaeoecologist Dr Gilbert Price said researchers working in Central Queensland were amazed when they found that Australia's early human inhabitants and giant apex predator lizards had overlapped.

Price reveals that they found evidence from a tiny fossil from a prehistoric giant lizard from a two feet deep excavation site in Capricorn Caves near Rockhampton which is a fossil rich site filled with millions of bones from thousands of prehistoric creatures. Measuring about one centimeter, the bone helped put together a picture of what the fearsome lizard looked like.

'The one-centimetre bone, an osteoderm, came from under the lizard's skin and is the youngest record of a giant lizard on the entire continent'.

It is believed to belong either to an ancient Komodo dragon or to a Megalania monitor lizard, a now extinct species that would grow to measure 6 meters (nearly 20 feet) from head to tail and weigh around 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds).

Using genome of man romantic relationship analysis, the old are cloaked for just 50,000 yester-year, that will happens... They were native to Australia, and flourished during the Pleistocene era. It was build like a predator, with stocky limbs, a large skull, and a jaw full of razor-like serrated teeth. But as some point during the last Ice Age, they disappeared. It was likely the largest venomous vertebrate ever discovered. This time frame coincides with migrations to Australia by its first aboriginal settlers. Australia's largest living lizard today is the perentie, which can grow up to two meters long.

Human ancestors lived alongside Giant Apex Predator Lizards Study
Human ancestors lived alongside Giant Apex Predator Lizards Study

Some of Australia's earliest human inhabitants may have had to deal with giant predator lizards that weighed up to half a tonne, Queensland researchers have found. The findings of the team were based on the discovery of the lizard fossils.

'It's been long-debated whether or not humans or climate change knocked off the giant lizards, alongside the rest of the megafauna, ' he continued.

As of now, humans can explain a part of the giant lizards' extinction, but there is still much information that scientists don't have.

The lizard bone was discovered within the Capricorn Caves, which caused the scientists to wonder how the bone made its way to such a unusual location in the first place.

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