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E3 2018: Jade Returns In Beyond Good & Evil 2

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Ignoring that fans have been waiting for this game since the originals release back in in 2003 on the PlayStation 2, Xbox, and GameCube, the game looks nothing short of unbelievable and with the reveal of original protagonist Jade in the prequels E3 2018 trailer will only fuel fan hype.

In addition, the publisher, which has been talking about its commitment to its player community for years now, is now inviting fans to help create the game they've been requesting for more than 15 years. The noxious chef turns out to be none other than Pey'j, your porcine pal from Beyond Good and Evil.

Some games surpass their developers' wildest imaginations.

While Elijah took to the stage to talk about his production company SpectreVision, Joseph discussed his online collaborative production company HitRecord.

Ubisoft are calling on artists all over the world to contribute to the world of Beyond Good & Evil 2, which means this is a huge endeavor that regular people can have a big part in.

That's not all though, as Ubisoft have also announced the Space Monkey programme that'll be partnered with Hit Record and Joseph Gordon Levitt. Beyond Good and Evil 2 will also feature whatever creations you can come up with. Gordon-Levitt did confirm, however, that users will be paid for their contributions.

Unfortunately, we did not get to see a release date for Beyond Good and Evil 2, but we did get a few exciting gameplay details. The first batch of artwork chosen to be used in Beyond Good & Evil 2 should be revealed by the end of 2018.

If it sounds like Ubisoft is outsourcing development on its open world to fans, that may be partially true, but the latest trailer suggests that Ubisoft has a grand story in mind for the prequel as well.

You can check out the new teaser trailer below.

Developed by Ubisoft Montpellier, Beyond Good and Evil 2puts players in System 3, a solar system that is at the center of interstellar colonization and trade in the Milky Way in the 24th century.

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