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Doctor's Orders: Start Preparing For Daylight Saving Time Now

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Florida Legislature has passed a bill that�would make the state the first to adopt year-round daylight saving time

The U.S. Department of Transportation did studies of daylight-saving time in 1974 and 1975, and concluded that the practice saves energy and lives.

Florida and most of the nation will spring ahead Sunday, moving clocks up one hour to observe daylight saving time - but if Sunshine State legislators get their way, Floridians won't be falling back.

"That night, try to go bed a little earlier", Narula said, "A half hour, 45 minutes earlier in the night".

Let's be honest: With the advent of personal computers and smartphones, the burden of Daylight Saving Time is not as heavy as it once was.

Nationwide daylight saving time began 100 years ago during World War I. During the long days of summer, the sun rose in some Northern regions between 4 and 5am, when most non-farmers were asleep. The Alberta government officially scrapped a bill past year aimed at getting rid of the semi-annual time change. It was used by Great Britain and the USA during both World Wars to cut power consumption in war plants and make blackouts more effective.

Fort Nelson and Creston stay on Mountain Standard Time year-round and do not change their clocks.

Daylight Saving Time, as it's known, is the move to optimise the daylight. If it goes into effect, Florida would become the first state on the east coast to break away from uniform time.

With the changing of seasons comes the changing of clocks and the subtraction of an hour of sleep from your nightly schedule. The twice-a-year time changes make it a little easier to keep in mind to check the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide alarms even though there should be regular testing of the devices through the year. They are not working now, presumably due to the winter, but I'm hoping they will be turned on as soon as spring arrives.

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