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Davis tells Tory rebels Brexit vote is irreversible

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The House of Commons is deciding whether to reject changes made to the EU Withdrawal Bill by the House of Lords in a two-day debate taking place today and tomorrow.

Speaking to a packed meeting of Tory MPs - including Chancellor Philip Hammond, Brexit Secretary David Davis and Environment Secretary Michael Gove - May said: "We must think about the message Parliament will send to the European Union this week". The Lords amendment was defeated in the Commons Tuesday by 324 votes to 298.

Ministers have conceded in principle to Tory rebels" demands for a "meaningful vote' on the eventual Brexit deal.

Five Labour MPs also rebelled by voting in favour of disagreeing with the Lords amendment: Ronnie Campbell, Frank Field, Kate Hoey, John Mann and Graham Stringer.

It is not clear what the rebels may have been offered by the Whips behind closed doors to persuade them to toe the party line.

"That term, Mr Speaker, is actually specifically defined in the Belfast Agreement and I've no doubt that government ministers will have read the Belfast Agreement in its entirety", she said.

But pro-EU Conservative lawmaker Dominic Grieve said that with the government's move "I am quite satisfied that we are going to get a meaningful vote on both "deal" and "no deal" scenarios.

A Conservative MP has resigned from his ministerial role ahead of a crucial Brexit vote in parliament.

The Democratic Unionist Party has said it will be supporting the government in the votes. If the government fails to pass the bill as it is, it will be forced to change what it asks for in negotiations with the European Union -undermining May's position and possibly threatening her job as Prime Minister.

Ms. May has said a government defeat would weaken its hand in exit talks with the European Union.

Buckland indicated the government would look into the possibility of adopting Grieve's push for ministers to secure parliamentary approval for their Brexit plans if they fail to negotiate a deal with the EU. It also attacked the unelected nature of the House of Lords (which traditionally scrutinizes laws passed to it by the elected lower chamber), linking it to a perceived attempt to frustrate the Brexit process.

Pro-Brexit tabloid the Sun warned lawmakers on Tuesday's front page that they had a choice: "Great Britain or great betrayal". The Daily Express featured the British flag as its front page with the headline: "Ignore the will of the people at your peril".

Ms. May's minority government relies on the support of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party for a slender working majority in the 650-member Commons. "The end of March 2019, we leave the E.U. Full stop".

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