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36% Less Likely to Buy Nike Products After Kaepernick Ad

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Candid Michael Strahan discussed the controversial former NFL player and whether or not he too would kneel in silent protest during the national anthem at football games on Monday's episode of The Ellen De Generes Show

Truett McConnell University (TMU) in Cleveland announced Friday that it will stop carrying Nike products in its campus store, and donate the proceeds from any remaining products to Wounded Warriors, a veterans charity, and the Fraternal Order of Police.

And to everyone who's upset with Nike's endorsement of Kaepernick: please don't destroy your shoes and clothing.

As a Good Morning America host and former NFL player, Michael Strahan is in a unique position to discuss the league's biggest controversy: players kneeling during the National Anthem in protest of police brutality.

Rev. Mack Morris, of the Woodridge Baptist Church in Mobile, held a Nike headband and wristband before cutting them up in an act of protest, AL.com reported.

In her commentary about recent news events, "Late Night" writer Amber Ruffin zeroed in on Nike's airing of the Colin Kaepernick ad during Thursday Night Football.

The campaign was launched over the Labour Day weekend in the US. Yes, endorsing Vick was a mistake for Nike, but the company should be commended, not boycotted, for supporting a true American hero like Kaepernick. I don't know. I think I would have'.

"Racial injustice is never acceptable, and all Americans need to work against it", Graham continued.

The head of both the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association and the humanitarian charity Samaritan's Purse compared it to "a kick in the gut to all those who have served under that flag, some making the ultimate sacrifice, to make our freedoms possible".

The polarized reaction to Nike's Colin Kaepernick advertisement continues as another college has severed ties with the brand, even as Nike sees increased sales numbers, according to CBS News. "The flat black jerseys have Kaepernick's name and No. 7 on the back, while having "#IMWITHKAP" inscribed on the front.

The shirts, not affiliated with Nike, retailed at $174.99 for adults and $99.99 for kids, sold out quickly.

Nike carefully weighed its choices with Kaepernick, and placed a strategic bet on the athlete-turned-social activist. "We also believe that those who know what sacrifice is all about are more likely to be wearing a military uniform than an athletic uniform".

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