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3 children among 7 killed in small plane crash near Kingston

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Bobmurod Nabiev and Sabina Usmanova

The US-registered single-engine Piper PA-32 departed Toronto's Buttonville Airport and was apparently headed to Quebec City when it crashed on approach to the Kingston, Ontario airport on Wednesday just after five pm (2200 GMT), Transportation Safety Board (TSB) investigator Ken Webster told a press conference.

An airplane crashed in a wooded area on the north shore of Lake Ontario in eastern Canada Wednesday evening and killed seven people in the north of Kingston.

The Transportation Safety Board says the seven people died when a small, USA -registered airplane crashed in a wooded area within city limits around 5 p.m.

According to a Facebook post by Wally Mulhearn, a Texas-based pilot examiner, Oblokulov received his private pilot certificate in May 2018.

Webster offered few details about the people on board the aircraft but Khudoyor Ortikov tells CityNews that his best friend of 20 years, Otabek Oblokulov, along with his wife and three kids, aged 16, 10 and 6, were on the plane along with his brother-in-law and his wife. After crash touchdown, the emergency locator transmitter activated and Seek and Rescue employees deployed to seek out the airplane.

A statement on the TSB's website notes there were "reports of deteriorating weather conditions at the time". Kingston Police Constable Ash Gutheinz said the area was under a wind advisory at the time, and while winds may not have been as bad as predicted, it was certainly "blustery". "We do look closely at this kind of information".

Oblokulov's friends, Zek Balikci and Mehmet Basti, were expecting Oblokulov for a stopover in Kingston on Wednesday.

Maj. Trevor Reid said the helicopter crew found the wreckage thanks to an emergency beacon on board the plane. "We waited a long time, so I searched on Google and this showed up", he said, referring to the crash. Further, he said that this type of plane does not have a "black box", which is usually required for larger planes, but there are other electronic devices that might have been able to record events before the crash.

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